Calendar

Feb
13
Wed
Society Lecture – Windows into a Tribal World: Iron Age Coins @ Methodist Church, Huntingdon
Feb 13 @ 7:30 pm – 10:00 pm

Windows into a Tribal World: Iron Age Coins – Dr Rodney Scarle

BelgaeRodney is a member of the Longstanton and District Heritage Iceni Gold Stater Norfolk Wolf 65-45BCSociety, whose interest in early coinage and what they can tell us about the people who used them was stimulated by his interest in local archaeology.

Over time he has built up quite an interesting and varied collection of coins and considerable expertise in them. In 2012/13 Rodney assisted with the examination and identification of over 30 Iron Age and Roman coins found during excavations at Wimpole Hall. Also, in 2015 he was actively involved with the digging of community test pits at Longstanton when they found lots of pottery and coins. 

Feb
19
Tue
Peterborough Museum – Fantastic Beasts @ Peterborough Museum
Feb 19 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

19 Feb 2019 7.30pm*
Fantastic Beasts and where to find them

Find out more about the Bonicon, a medieval beast found at Longthorpe Tower, Castor church and the Peterborough Besitary. This talk focuses on the Romanesque capitals of St Kyneburgha church, Castor and the local landscape in medieval times.

Dr Susan E Kilby, Medieval Historian, University of Leicester

Mar
13
Wed
Society Lecture – The Changing Fields of Huntingdonshire @ Huntingdon Methodist Church
Mar 13 @ 7:30 pm – 10:00 pm

The Changing Fields of Huntingdonshire – William Franklin

If you have wondered about the shape and structure of field boundaries, how they were formed, when they were laid out and by whom, and how this was influenced by the then owner of the land, the King, Church, Lord or State. Then come along to the Methodist Church on Wednesday 13th March and get to know about the intricate and often bizarre shape of our field boundaries.

The speaker tonight is William Franklin, whose most recent book, “An Agricultural History of Ely” was given an award by the Cambridgeshire Association for Local History (CALH). This is, however, only part of his broader investigation across the county into the development of fields from antiquity to the age of parliamentary inclosure. 

Mar
30
Sat
Your Roman Past – Nene Valley Archaeology @ Castor CP School
Mar 30 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Your Roman Past – Saturday 30th March 9AM to 5PM – Castor CP School

The Nene Valley area is literally covered with Roman forts and occupation following the main arterial road Ermine Street. Perhaps the most well known site is just to the north of Peterborough close by Water Newton just off the current A1. The Roman Town of Durobrivae and the Roman fort adjacent to the town protecting the crossing of the river Nene.

Come along to this exciting day of exploration of our Roman history and listen to the guest speakers, Geoffrey Dannell, Chris Evans, John Peter Wild, Ralph Jackson, Stephen Upex and William Burke, talk about the influence of Roman occupation in the Nene Valley.

Tickets can be obtained through Eventbrite, cost £25 including lunch. Student concession £20

 

Apr
10
Wed
Societ Lecture – The Curious History of Labyrinths and Mazes @ Huntingdon Methodist Church
Apr 10 @ 7:30 pm – 10:00 pm

The Curious History of Labyrinths and Mazes – Julie Boundford

Following a book on Heffers, the Cambridgeshire bookseller, Julie was commissioned to write one on Mazes and Labyrinths. From prehistoric times mazes and labyrinths have served as different symbolic, ritualistic and practical purposes. She will tell us about her discoveries, local and further afield.

We have our own mystical labyrinth at Hilton, which the Society visited in 2016 

 

 

 

 

The symbolic meaning of labyrinth is often associated with the various symbolic meanings of the spiral in that we can trace our footsteps (both metaphorical and literal) back to and from the centre.

May
10
Fri
Society Weekend Excursion to Birmingham and Warwickshire
May 10 – May 13 all-day

HUNTINGDONSHIRE LOCAL HISTORY SOCIETY

MAY WEEKEND 10TH TO 13TH MAY 2019 BIRMINGHAM AND WARWICKSHIRE

For a copy of the program click [here]

Depart Huntingdon 9am  Arrive 11am

Day 1 Friday   

Forge Mill Needle Museum & Bordesley Abbey

Tour includes coffee on arrival and lunch.                                             

Forge Mill Needle Museum in Redditch is an unusual and fascinating place to visit. This historic site illustrates the rich heritage of the needle and fishing tackle industries. Models and recreated scenes provide a vivid illustration of how needles were once made, and how Redditch once produced 90% of the world’s needles.

On the same site, just a very short walk from Forge Mill Museum, are the ruins of Bordesley Abbey – a medieval Cistercian Abbey which has been extensively excavated. Bordesley Abbey Visitor Centre, which is set in an original reconstructed 16th century barn, tells the extraordinary story of the Abbey from its development in the 12th century to its destruction in 1538 by Henry VIII during the dissolution.

http://www.forgemill.org.uk/

depart at 4pm for Ramada Birmingham Sutton Coldfield

www.ramadasuttonhotel.co.uk

Penns Lane, Walmley, Sutton Coldfield B76 1LH    0121 351 3111

Day 2 Saturday

Museum of the Jewellery Quarter

Depart Hotel at 9.45am arrive at 10.15am

The Museum of the Jewellery Quarter is built around a perfectly preserved jewellery workshop offering a unique glimpse of working life in Birmingham’s famous Jewellery Quarter.

When the proprietors of the Smith & Pepper jewellery manufacturing firm retired in 1981 they simply ceased trading and locked the door, unaware they would be leaving a time capsule for future generations.

Today the factory is a remarkable museum, which tells the story of the Jewellery Quarter and Birmingham’s renowned jewellery and metalworking heritage.

http://www.birminghammuseums.org.uk/jewellery

depart 12.30pm

Aston Hall

Arrive 1.00  Time for Lunch

Aston Hall is a magnificent seventeenth century red-brick mansion situated in a picturesque public park on the north side of Birmingham. Built between 1618 and 1635 for Sir Thomas Holte and home to James Watt Junior from 1817-1848, Aston Hall is steeped in history. Now a grade I listed building, the hall is restored to its former Jacobean splendour and is hugely popular with visitors of all ages. Walk through the stunning interiors and see the home that received royalty, was besieged during the English Civil War and inspired an author.

http://www.birminghammuseums.org.uk/aston/about

Depart 4.30pm for hotel

 

Day 3  Sunday

Depart 9.15am arrive 10.00am

Black Country Museum

The story of the Black Country is distinctive because of the scale, drama, intensity and multiplicity of the industrial might that was unleashed. It first emerged in the 1830s, creating the first industrial landscape anywhere in the world.

Beneath the smoke and glare from blast furnaces and forges, Black Country innovation, entrepreneurial and manufacturing skill established the region’s supremacy for the making of wrought iron. The Black Country also possessed important hardware and other manufactures distinctive to itself – structural ironwork, chain making, locks and keys, tube manufacture, trap making and many others – which brought fame to Black Country towns across the globe.

Our award-winning corner of the West Midlands is now one of the finest and largest open-air museums in the United Kingdom. After very humble beginnings, a bright idea and 40 years of inspiration, this is twenty six acres worth exploring. Amazing as it may seem, we have created a ‘place’ – a real and lively place, where once there was nothing and nobody. Depart Museum at 2.00pm arrive Winterbourne at 2.30pm

Winterbourne House and Gardens

A Pioneering History. The house was built for John Nettlefold, a pioneer of early housing reform in Birmingham at a time when the city had a serious lack of decent homes for working people. John and his wife Margaret were from prestigious local families who had made their living in industry. Choosing their house to be designed in the Arts and Crafts style reflected their modern outlook. Winterbourne is a rare surviving example of an early 20th century suburban villa and garden. The house was built in 1903 for John and Margaret Nettlefold, of Guest, Keen & Nettlefold.

 Originally designed as a small country estate with rustic outbuildings and large gardens, Winterbourne followed the style of the Arts and Crafts movement with examples of local craftsmanship throughout the house.

Margaret Nettlefold designed the garden, inspired by the books and garden designs of Gertrude Jekyll. After a period of restoration, the garden was Grade II listed by English Heritage in 2008.

 

Depart Winterbourne at 5pm for hotel

Day 4 Monday

depart 9.15am arrive 10.15am

Croome

Expect the unexpected. Incredible innovation, devastating loss, remarkable survival and magnificent restoration. All in one place

There’s more than meets the eye at Croome. A secret wartime airbase, now a visitor centre, was once a hub of activity for thousands of people. Outside is the grandest of English landscapes, ‘Capability’ Brown’s masterful first commission, with commanding views over the Malverns. The parkland was nearly lost, but is now great for walks and adventures with a surprise around every corner. At the heart of the park lies Croome Court, once home to the Earls of Coventry with four floors to explore. The 6th Earl of Coventry was an 18th century trend-setter and today Croome follows his lead by using artists and craftspeople in the house to tell the story of its eclectic past in inventive ways, perfect for making new discoveries.

Cream scones and tea will be served before we leave.

https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/croome

depart for Huntingdon  5pm

May
15
Wed
Society AGM @ Huntingdon Town Hall
May 15 @ 7:30 pm – 10:00 pm

Further details to follow shortly

Jun
29
Sat
Huntingdonshire History Festival
Jun 29 – Jul 31 all-day

Full details to follow shortly

Dec
10
Tue
Society Christmas Social – Assembly Rooms, Town Hall
Dec 10 @ 7:30 pm – 10:00 pm

Full details and booking information to follow shortly