Calendar

Mar
13
Wed
Society Lecture – The Changing Fields of Huntingdonshire @ Huntingdon Methodist Church
Mar 13 @ 7:30 pm – 10:00 pm

The Changing Fields of Huntingdonshire – William Franklin

If you have wondered about the shape and structure of field boundaries, how they were formed, when they were laid out and by whom, and how this was influenced by the then owner of the land, the King, Church, Lord or State. Then come along to the Methodist Church on Wednesday 13th March and get to know about the intricate and often bizarre shape of our field boundaries.

The speaker tonight is William Franklin, whose most recent book, “An Agricultural History of Ely” was given an award by the Cambridgeshire Association for Local History (CALH). This is, however, only part of his broader investigation across the county into the development of fields from antiquity to the age of parliamentary inclosure. 

Apr
10
Wed
Societ Lecture – The Curious History of Labyrinths and Mazes @ Huntingdon Methodist Church
Apr 10 @ 7:30 pm – 10:00 pm

The Curious History of Labyrinths and Mazes – Julie Boundford

Following a book on Heffers, the Cambridgeshire bookseller, Julie was commissioned to write one on Mazes and Labyrinths. From prehistoric times mazes and labyrinths have served as different symbolic, ritualistic and practical purposes. She will tell us about her discoveries, local and further afield.

We have our own mystical labyrinth at Hilton, which the Society visited in 2016 

 

 

 

 

The symbolic meaning of labyrinth is often associated with the various symbolic meanings of the spiral in that we can trace our footsteps (both metaphorical and literal) back to and from the centre.

May
15
Wed
Society AGM @ Huntingdon Town Hall
May 15 @ 7:30 pm – 10:00 pm

Further details to follow shortly

Jul
17
Wed
President’s Lecture and Goodliff Awards Ceremony @ Huntingdon Town Hall
Jul 17 @ 7:30 pm – 10:00 pm

The 2019 Goodliff Awards are being presented at the Society’s President’s Lecture, which this year is taking place during the Huntingdonshire History Festival. Because it is being advertised with other events and we fully expect a full room, admission, even for members, will be by prior booking.

After the presentation of the Goodliff Awards, Dr Thurley will give his lecture, HERITAGE and HOUSING, for which he has provided the following introduction:

Providing enough houses for people to live in is one of the great issues affecting Huntingdonshire and indeed England today. It is an issue for people looking to buy new homes and settle into this area, but also one for those wanting to protect the distinctiveness of their historic towns and villages. Most new house building is undertaken in disregard of the vernacular traditions of the places in which it is undertaken. Historic settlements all over England are fighting what they regard as inappropriate development on their doorstep. Does it have to be like this? Can heritage and conservation be reconciled with the ambitions of the volume housebuilder? I will look at the issues in historical, geographical and economic context and suggest a way forwards.

Please use the BOOKING FORM accompanying the Summer 2019 Almanack to tell us you are coming, or otherwise let David Smith know by email info@huntslhs.org..uk or phone 01480 350127  by Sunday 30th June at the latest

Aug
17
Sat
Society Excursion – Southwell Minster and Corby Glen Church
Aug 17 all-day

 

 

An opportunity to join in with the annual Cambridgeshire Historic Churches Trust led excursion to a great church, which benefits from the expert commentary and guidance of Revd. Lynne Broughton. Lunchtime opportunity to explore Southwell.

 

On the way back we will visit the church at Corby Glen where we will have the opportunity for a cup of tea there. 

 

 

 

 

 

Further information see separate booking form and information sheet, to access please click on [BOOKING FORM]

Book by Saturday 1st June. Please note early deadline

 

Sep
13
Fri
Society Excursion -Wingfield College and Eye Church
Sep 13 all-day

This will be a coach excursion, joint with Cambridge Association for Local History (CALH) and Cambridge Antiquarian Society (CAS), visiting Eye Church and Wingfield College (house and church).

SS. Peter and Paul Eye is one of those astonishing late medieval churches that seems to have everything: one of the finest rood screens in the region, a fan vault in the tower, a wealth of monuments, a sanctuary by Ninian Comper, a recently restored organ. We shall arrive shortly after their regular Friday service and be able to join for coffee. After looking round we are free to explore the market town, perhaps mount the castle motte, and find lunch in one of several eateries.

At 1:30pm we reassemble for the short trip onward to Wingfield College. The Palladian lines of this private house conceal a medieval manor, remodelled as a charity college by Sir John Wingfield in 1362, ‘a maze of medieval woodwork, every inch of which is intriguing’ (Jenkins). The visit includes the parish church, where Sir John is buried, but whose glory is the fabulous tombs of the de la Pole Dukes of Suffolk, and concludes with tea and cake.

Leave Huntingdon Bus Station 9:30am,: depart Wingfield 4:40pm, return c6:30pm.This is a joint excursion with Cambridgeshire Association for Local History. Early booking is strongly recommended. 

Other pick up points (indicate clearly on the form): Somersham (Dews) 8:55am, St Ives (Houghton Road) 9:15am, Hartford (Longstaff Way) 9:25am, Godmanchester (Bridge Place Car Park) 9:35am, Cambridge (Milton Park and Ride) 10:15am.

The cost will be approximately £34 per head. Book by Saturday 31 August, Maximum 40 people.

 

Oct
9
Wed
Society Talk – Churches and Chapels – the Past, Present and Future @ Huntingdon Methodist Church
Oct 9 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

Michael Dudley will talk about the growth of chapels and churches in the local area and how the church landscape has changed over the centuries.

Throughout the country there are today more places of worship than clergy to conduct weekly services in them. Church attendance and communicants has declined significantly and our churches are now in a position where the cost of upkeep and maintenance is being bourn by fewer folk. Sadly, a great number of our churches, a lot of them listed buildings, are beginning to fall into decay; not helped by the thoughtless actions of some thieves stealing the lead of the roof resulting in enormous cost of damage to the fabric of the buildings. 

Many of the older churches are fine architectural edifices that should be preserved regardless of declining finances. We have seen charitable organisations such as The Churches Preservation Trust, The National Trust and Heritage England, formed to stem the tide of decay and dereliction of our architectural heritage, helping to restore and preserve these old estates and building for everyone to enjoy. So, what is to become of our churches and chapels? Will more be sold off to become desirable homes for the few?

Come along to hear Michael Dudley’s talk and get to know what can be done.

 

Nov
12
Tue
Society Talk – Opium Eating in the Fens in the 19th Century @ Huntingdon Methodist Church
Nov 12 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

Opium Eating in the Fens – Talk by Dr Eric Somerville

In the 19th Century opium was commonly used as a remedy for a large number of common ailments. It is hard to believe that it was possible to walk into a chemist shop and buy without a prescription cocaine and laudanum. Opium preparations, (‘little white powder’) were freely sold in towns and markets and in the countryside by travelling ‘hawksters’. Taking opium became as popular as alcohol. Surprisingly, opium was also used as a ‘quieten’  tincture for children.

Dr Eric Somerville is coming to speak to us about “Opium-eating in the Fens in the Nineteenth Century”.  It’s interesting to learn that fenland folk didn’t smoke opium, they consumed it, and did so in quantities, to the extent that it has been calculated that half of imported opium went there.  Dr Somerville has made an extensive study of the subject and since he’s a retired Wisbech G.P. expect some reflections on drug use today.

Admission free to Society Members, guests are welcome and we ask for a small £3 donation for the evening.

Parking: Building work has now started at the church and there is only Disabled Parking there, so please allow a few minutes more to park in Malthouse Close or Ingram Street car parks.

Dec
10
Tue
Society Christmas Social – Assembly Rooms, Town Hall @ Huntingdon Town Hall
Dec 10 @ 7:30 pm – 10:00 pm

Christmas Social – A Georgian Christmas, with Bedford Gallery Quire, Tuesday 10th December

Its that time of year, the Christmas festive season is fast approaches again. Once more we have a super programme lined up for our Christmas social.  The Christmas social is undoubtedly one of the sheer joys of this society, so do make an effort to come along.  You will not be disappointed.  And by all means bring friends with you.  

This year The Bedford Gallery Quire, will be providing the musical entertainment. They are part of the movement to resurrect the folk tradition, coined ‘West Gallery Music’ by Thomas Hardy, The Quire was formed in 2003 and is a group of singers and instrumentalists performing musical pieces from the ‘West Gallery’ period, around 1700 to 1850. West Gallery music is often seen as an anarchic musical attribute of the parish church until reforming Victorian clergy suppressed them in favour of the more governable, surpliced, choirs singing in the chancel that we know today.  Besides playing fiddles and flutes they will be performing traditional music on some less familiar instruments including flagelettes, an ophicleïde, and a serpent – a rare sight indeed.  

We will again be providing sandwiches, etc., as well as drinks, but members are welcome to bring additional seasonal fare.  It would be helpful if you haven’t already done so , it you would book as soon as possible.  This enables us to tell how many spaces available for non-members.  David Smith will be there on Tuesday to take bookings and your £5.00, or send him a cheque with form in the Almanack, or at very least email him at info@huntslhs.org.uk to let him know you are coming and pay on the night. 

Jan
8
Wed
Society Talk – Cromwell’s First Campaign, 1643 @ Huntingdon Methodist Church
Jan 8 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

Stuart Orme, the Curator of the Cromwell Museum will talk to us about Oliver Cromwell’s first campaigns in 1643 at Huntingdon, Peterborough, Crowland and the Battle of Gainsborough on 28th July. Cromwell went from a small landowner MP to a significant General and a force to be reckoned with in Parliament.  Cromwell was first elected to Parliament in 1628 but by 1631 he was in financial difficulty and was forced to sell his land. He returned to Parliament in 1640 but by 1642 armed conflict had begun between Charles 1 and Parliament. It was in 1642 that Cromwell’s career as a military leader began. He distinguished himself in battle at Edgehill in 1642 and again in the East in 42 and 43. By 1644 he had risen to the rank of Lieutenant General. 

Stuart Orme will look at the early career of Cromwell and his meteoric rise to the highest ranks of the New Model Army.

Visitors are welcome and are invited to donate £3 to defray costs.